Unmasking Brugada Syndrome with Oral Flecainide Provocation. A Case Series of Three Patients

Main Article Content

R. Singla
A. Udyavar
A. Gupta
A. Bade
K. Munde
N. O. Bansal

Abstract

The present case series discuss three patients who had brugada type 2/ type 3 like ECG pattern that was converted to type 1 pattern with oral flecanide challenge test. Brugada syndrome is associated with a high incidence of sudden cardiac death,   typical ECG pattern being ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads with T wave inversion. Pharmacological provocation should only be performed when the baseline ECG is not diagnostic of Brugada Syndrome. PR prolongation in the baseline ECG is also a contraindication because of the risk of inducing AV block. Drug challenge is performed under strict monitoring of BP and 12-lead ECG and facilities for cardio version and resuscitation are available. Atypical RBBB pattern/type 2/3 Brugada pattern on ECG in patients of syncope or family history of sudden cardiac arrest is commonly encountered by a cardiologist. This can be performed to provoke type 1 brugada pattern on ECG. Diagnosed cases of Brugada may be treated with ICD with proper indication if needed and thus prevent sudden cardiac death.

Keywords:
Brugada syndrome, AV block, oral flecanide, coronary angiography

Article Details

How to Cite
Singla, R., Udyavar, A., Gupta, A., Bade, A., Munde, K., & Bansal, N. O. (2019). Unmasking Brugada Syndrome with Oral Flecainide Provocation. A Case Series of Three Patients. Cardiology and Angiology: An International Journal, 8(4), 1-6. https://doi.org/10.9734/ca/2019/v8i430108
Section
Case Study

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