The Bacterial Profile of Aortic Infectious Endocards: Experience of the Cardiology Department, Mohammed VI University Hospital of Marrakech, Morocco

Junior Rocyr Ibara Onguema *

Cardiology Department, ERRAZI Hospital, Mohammed VI University Hospital of Marrakech, Morocco.

Rim Zerhoudi

Cardiology Department, ERRAZI Hospital, Mohammed VI University Hospital of Marrakech, Morocco.

Franck Bienvenu Ekoba Othende

Cardiology Department, ERRAZI Hospital, Mohammed VI University Hospital of Marrakech, Morocco.

Khaoula Bourzeg

Cardiology Department, ERRAZI Hospital, Mohammed VI University Hospital of Marrakech, Morocco.

Mohammed Eljamili

Cardiology Department, ERRAZI Hospital, Mohammed VI University Hospital of Marrakech, Morocco.

Saloua El Karimi

Cardiology Department, ERRAZI Hospital, Mohammed VI University Hospital of Marrakech, Morocco.

Mustapha Elhattaoui

Cardiology Department, ERRAZI Hospital, Mohammed VI University Hospital of Marrakech, Morocco.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Introduction: Infective endocarditis is defined as infection of a native or prosthetic heart valve, endocardial surface, or cardiac device. The causes and epidemiology, as well as the microbiology of the disease have evolved over the last few decades with the doubling of the average age of patients and an increased prevalence in patients with indwelling cardiac devices.

Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective study, including all subjects over 20 years of age who presented with infective endocarditis of the aortic valve, hospitalized between January 2019 and December 2022, in the Department of Cardiology and Vascular Diseases at ERRAZI Hospital-Mohammed VI University Hospital in Marrakech. Clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic data were collected for each case using an exploitation form.

Results: Over the study period, 46 patients had presented with aortic positional AR, with a sex ratio that was equal to 1.8. The mean age of the patients was 43±12.5 years. Endocarditis on aortic prosthesis was found in 15%. The valves were rheumatic in 85%. The presumed portal of entry was cutaneous in 45%, oral and ENT in 33%, urinary in 15%, and digestive in 7%. In our series, 21 out of 26 patients presented a biological inflammatory syndrome. At least one or more blood cultures were positive in 38% of cases. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most common germ in aortic infective endocarditis, found in 40% of positive blood cultures. All the patients in our series had received a combination of broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotic therapy, initially probabilistic, taking into consideration the portal of entry. Adapted after antibiogram results. The evolution during the hospitalization, was marked by an improvement of the clinical state in only 12%, a perioperative death in 38%, and a worsening of the clinical state in 50%, with an average duration of hospitalization of 14 days. In our series, 60% of the patients with positive blood cultures died, whereas there was 75% survival in the group with negative blood cultures.

Conclusion: Infective endocarditis is a serious disease because of its high morbidity and mortality. Despite improvements in diagnostic testing, antimicrobial therapy, and surgical intervention, changes in the epidemiology of IE, including the increase in healthcare-associated infections and the virulence of staphylococcus aureus as the causative organism, increase the risk of complications and death in the acute phase of IE. Action must be taken to prevent infective endocarditis, especially in this rheumatically endemic area.

Keywords: Aortic endocarditis, bacterial transplantation, blood culture, resistance, antibiotic therapy


How to Cite

Onguema , J. R. I., Zerhoudi , R., Othende , F. B. E., Bourzeg , K., Eljamili , M., Karimi , S. E., & Elhattaoui , M. (2023). The Bacterial Profile of Aortic Infectious Endocards: Experience of the Cardiology Department, Mohammed VI University Hospital of Marrakech, Morocco. Cardiology and Angiology: An International Journal, 12(4), 74–84. https://doi.org/10.9734/ca/2023/v12i4345


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Junior Rocyr Ibara Onguema, Rim Zerhoudi, Franck Bienvenu Ekoba Othende, Khaoula Bourzeg, Mohammed Eljamili, Saloua El Karimi, Mustapha ElHattaoui. Echocardiographic Aspect Of Infectious Aortic Endocarditis: Experience Of The Cardiology Department, Mohammed Vi University Hospital Of Marrakech, Morocco. Cardiology and Angiology: An International Journal, 2023 (Article in Press).